Demography and statistics of Diaspora Jewry, 1920-1970 bibliography by UniversitМЈah ha-К»Ivrit bi-Yerushalayim. Makhon le-Yahadut zemanenu.

Cover of: Demography and statistics of Diaspora Jewry, 1920-1970 | UniversitМЈah ha-К»Ivrit bi-Yerushalayim. Makhon le-Yahadut zemanenu.

Published by Institute of Contemporary Jewry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem in [Jerusalem] .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Jews -- Bibliography.,
  • Jews -- Statistics -- Bibliography.

Edition Notes

Title on p. [4] of cover: Demografyah u-sṭaṭisṭiḳah shel Yehude ha-tefutsot, 1920-1970.

Book details

Other titlesDemografyah u-sṭaṭisṭiḳah shel Yehude ha-tefutsot, 1920-1970.
Statement[general editor, U. O. Schmelz].
SeriesJewish population studies
ContributionsSchmelz, U. O.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsZ6366 .J52 1976a, DS143 .J52 1976a
The Physical Object
Paginationv. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4488879M
LC Control Number79318348

Download Demography and statistics of Diaspora Jewry, 1920-1970

Demography and statistics of Diaspora Jewry, [Jerusalem]: Institute of Contemporary Jewry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: U O Schmelz; Universiṭah ha-ʻIvrit bi-Yerushalayim.

Makhon le-Yahadut zemanenu. centres of Jewish demographic research disappeared, and the great majo­ rity of Diaspora Jewry found itself in countries in which official statistics did not supply data on the Jews~ 1.

The. Bureau ffJr Statistik der Juden (in Berlin), which published, among others, the. His areas of interest are Jewish migration, Jewish identification, the Jewish family, Israel-Diaspora relations, and population projections. His works mainly focus on American Jews and the Israeli population.

His most recent book is Jews and the American Religious Landscape (, Columbia University Press). COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The encyclopedia is organized in three volumes. The first includes essays on the Jewish Diaspora experience, with coverage ranging from ethnography and demography to philosophy, history, music, and business. The second and third volumes feature hundreds of articles and essays on Diaspora regions, countries, cities, and other locations.

Academic career. Della Pergola is a specialist on the demography of world Jewry and has published numerous books and over two hundred papers on historical demography, the family, international migration, Jewish identification, and population projections in the Diaspora and in Israel.

He has written extensively about demography in Israel and Palestine. Arnold Dashefsky, Ph.D. served as the inaugural holder of the Doris and Simon Konover Chair of Judaic Studies and Professor of Sociology at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, where he is now is the co-author or editor of fourteen books, including Americans Abroad, Charitable Choices, Ethnic Identification Among American Jews, among others, as well as numerous scholarly.

Acknowledgments. Since inception, the American Jewish Year Book has documented the Jewish world and gave significant attention to Jewish population issues. Sinceresponsibility for preparing annual population estimates for world Jewry was taken by the Division of Jewish Demography and Statistics of the A.

Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Recent Jewish population dynamics are characterized by continued steady increase in the Israeli Jewish population and flat or declining numbers in other countries (the diaspora).

The Jewish population of Israel increased from the country's inception in to 6, in while the population of the diaspora has dropped from to The Jewish diaspora (Hebrew: תְּפוּצָה ‎, romanized: tfutza) or exile (Hebrew: גָּלוּת galut; Yiddish: golus) refers to the dispersion of Israelites or Jews out of their ancestral homeland (the Land of Israel) and their subsequent settlement in other 1920-1970 book of the globe.

In terms of the Hebrew Bible, the term "Exile" denotes the fate of the Israelites who were taken into. The encyclopedia is organized in three volumes. The first includes essays on the Jewish Diaspora experience, with coverage ranging from ethnography and demography to philosophy, history, music, and business.

The second and third volumes feature hundreds of articles and essays on Diaspora regions, countries, cities, and other s: 8. What was life like for Jews settled throughout the Mediterranean world of Classical antiquity--and what place did Jewish communities have in the diverse civilization dominated by Greeks and Romans.

In a probing account Demography and statistics of Diaspora Jewry the Jewish diaspora in the four centuries from Alexander the Great's conquest of the Near East to the Roman destruction of the Jewish Temple in 70 C.E., Erich Gruen reaches.

Jews constitute an ethnic minority in Russia; therefore, ethnic identification is an important component of their social identity (Tolts, ). Moreover, Russian Jews are a diaspora group; i.e., a group that has strong cultural and religious connections with its historical homeland (Khanin,Remennick,Shuval, ).

The first significant Jewish Diaspora was the result of the Babylonian Exile of the Babylonians conquered the kingdom of Judah, part of the Jewish population was deported into slavery. Although Cyrus the Great, the Persian conqueror of Babylonia, permitted the Jews to return to their homeland in bce, part of the Jewish community voluntarily remained behind.

Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, “Israel in Statistics ,” Statistilite 93 (Jerusalem: Central Bureau of Statistics, ); and Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, “Population and Demography,” accessed aton Sept.

12, According to DellaPergola, within the larger Jewish Diaspora, the world’s Jewish. The demographic challenges are distinctly different for Israel and the diaspora.

Most Jews in the diaspora may be unaware that Israel has now overtaken the United States, as the country with the largest Jewish population.

InIsrael had a smaller Jewish population than the U.S. or the rest of the diaspora outside the U.S. Byit had the. Demographic Avant-Garde elucidates what made Jews in Bohemia true forerunners of the demographic transition and why this occurred when it did.

It scrutinizes demographic statistics from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-twentieth century, and examines what made Bohemian Jews' data distinct from the trends observed in the gentile community and among Author: Jana Vobecka.

The encyclopedia is organized in three volumes. The first includes essays on the Jewish Diaspora experience, with coverage ranging from ethnography and demography to philosophy, history, music, and business.

The second and third volumes feature hundreds of articles and essays on Diaspora regions, countries, cities, and other : $ Jewish Diaspora Books Showing of 80 The Lost Family: How DNA Testing Is Uncovering Secrets, Reuniting Relatives, and Upending Who We Are (Hardcover) by.

Libby Copeland (Goodreads Author) (shelved 1 time as jewish-diaspora) avg rating — ratings — published Want to. An internationally known specialist on the demography of world Jewry, he has published numerous books including Jewish Demographic Policies: Population Trends and Options, Jerusalem () and over two hundred papers on historical demography, the family, international migration, Jewish identification, and projections in the Diaspora and in Israel.

Mordechai Altshuler, Soviet Jewry since the Second World War: Population and Social Structure (New York, ); Mordechai Altshuler, Soviet Jewry on the Eve of the Holocaust: A Social and Demographic Profile (Jerusalem, ); American Jewish Year Book, various years, articles by Sergio DellaPergola and Uziel O.

Schmelz; Roberto Bachi, Population Trends of World Jewry (Jerusalem, ); Bruno. Diaspora Jews thus far outnumbered the Jews in Palestine even before the destruction of Jerusalem in CE Thereafter, the chief centres of Judaism shifted from country to country (e.g., Babylonia, Persia, Spain, France, Germany, Poland, Russia and the United States – diasporas).

The discrepancy is accounted for by the results of recent demographic studies undertaken in a number of local American Jewish communities which have discovered unexpectedly large Jewish populations in sunbelt metropolitan areas (American Jewish Year Book ).

T more Jews were "found" between and as a result of these studies. “Jewish Population Policies” will offer the broadest possible outlook on Jewish demography and Jewish peoplehood to date, now being published for the first time in this all-encompassing book.

In this book, Yehuda Bauer, an internationally acclaimed Holocaust historian, describes the destruction of small Jewish townships, the shtetls, in what was the eastern part of Poland by the Nazis.

Get this from a library. Encyclopedia of the Jewish diaspora: origins, experiences, and culture. [M Avrum Ehrlich;] -- From the Roman occupation of Judea circa A.D.

to the founding of Israel, Jewish people were without a sovereign homeland. But far from. The Portuguese people are a Romance nation indigenous to Portugal who share a common Portuguese culture, ancestry and predominant religion is Christianity, mainly Roman Catholicism, though other religions and irreligion are also present, especially among the younger generations.

The Portuguese people's heritage largely derives from the pre-Celts (Lusitanians, Conii) and Celts. The negation of the Diaspora (Hebrew: שלילת הגלות ‎, shlilat ha'galut, or Hebrew: שלילת הגולה ‎, shlilat ha'golah) is a central assumption in many currents of concept encourages the dedication to Zionism and it is used to justify the denial of the feasibility of Jewish emancipation in the Diaspora.

According to the book that bears his name, Daniel is a Judean wise man who advises foreign kings during the time of the Babylonian exile and receives revelations concerning the end.

Daniel and Diaspora. The variety of languages and genres employed in the book of Daniel hints at its roots in the Jewish Diaspora. Emergence of Judaism. Mexico was the largest Diaspora Jewish community with an out-marriage rate estimated at less that 15%. Glikson and S.

DellaPergola (eds.), Papers in Jewish Demography, Demografie van de Joden in Nederland (); S.J. Prais and M. Schmool, "Statistics of Jewish Marriages in Great Britain: –," in: JJS, vol. 9, n. The first includes essays on the Jewish Diaspora experience, with coverage ranging from ethnography and demography to philosophy, history, music, and business.

The second and third volumes feature hundreds of articles and essays on Diaspora. The ethnic groups in the Middle East refers to the peoples that reside in Western Asia and Egypt in North Africa, a transcontinental region commonly known as the Middle region has historically been a crossroad of different cultures.

Since the s, the changes in political and economic factors (especially the enormous oil wealth in the region and conflicts) have significantly altered. Jews [from Judah], traditionally, descendants of Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, whose tribe, with that of his half-brother Benjamin, made up the kingdom of Judah; historically, members of the worldwide community of adherents to degree to which national and religious elements of Jewish culture interact has varied throughout history and has been a matter of considerable debate.

Despite offering a definition of Zionism as “active support for Israel and her policies”, it included two pages of demographic statistics about American Jews, including population size and distribution, birth rate, education, occupation, income and religious observance.

MPI has produced profiles of 15 diaspora communities in the United States, gathering in one place key demographic data and analysis on diasporas from Bangladesh, Colombia, El Salvador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Haiti, India, Kenya, Mexico, Morocco, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

The profiles examine population size, educational attainment, household income, employment patterns. The Jewish population in Israel comprises all Jewish diaspora communities, including Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, Mizrahi Jews, Beta Israel, Cochin Jews, Bene Israel, Karaite Jews, and many other Israeli Jewish community manifests a wide range of Jewish cultural traditions, as well as encompassing the full spectrum of religious observance, from the haredi communities to the.

Half of Jews (49%) reside in urban areas and a similar number (47%) reside in the suburbs; just 4% of Jews reside in rural areas. As a whole, Jews support the Democratic Party over the Republican Party by more than three-to-one: 70% say they are Democrats or lean toward the Democratic Party, while 22% are Republicans or lean Republican.

Jewish statistics with some comments on their reproduction, urbanization and intermarriage are given in U.Z. Engleman's article (chap p. ) in the same book. Migration of the Jews in forms the topic of J.

Letschinsky's chapter in the above (p. As a theoretical base, the book introduces the complexity of the shift of Christendom’s center of gravity to the global South, and the demography changes of the large scale diaspora movements of refugees and economic migrants since the second half of the twentieth century.

Introduction. Jews originated as a national and religious group in the Middle East during the second millennium BCE 1 and have maintained continuous genetic, cultural, and religious traditions since that time, despite a series of Diasporas.

2 Middle Eastern (Iranian and Iraqi) Jews date from communities that were formed in the Babylon and Persian Empires in the fourth to sixth centuries. Sincenon-Jewish immigrants have been labeled "Other" (non-Jews) in official statistics to differentiate them from the native Arab population.

According to the Central Bureau of Statistics, the "Other" share increased from percent of the overall population in to percent indecreasing the Jewish share from percent.The phrase African diaspora gradually entered common usage at the turn of the 21st century. The term diaspora originates from the Greek διασπορά (diaspora, literally "scattering") which gained popularity in English in reference to the Jewish diaspora before being more broadly applied to other populations.

Less commonly, the term has been used in scholarship to refer to more recent.A diaspora (from Greek διασπορά, "scattering, dispersion") [1] is a scattered population whose origin lies within a smaller geographic locale.

Diaspora can also refer to the movement of the population from its original homeland. [2] [3] Diaspora has come to refer particularly to historical mass dispersions of an involuntary nature, such as the expulsion of Jews from Judea, the fleeing.

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