Informal small enterprise clusters a case study of auto-mechanic villages in Ibadan by Bayo Akinbinu

Cover of: Informal small enterprise clusters | Bayo Akinbinu

Published by NISER in Ibadan .

Written in English

Read online

Places:

  • Nigeria,
  • Ibadan.

Subjects:

  • Small business -- Location -- Nigeria -- Ibadan.,
  • Automobile repair shops -- Location -- Nigeria -- Ibadan.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [50]-51).

Book details

Statement"Bayo Akinbinu.
SeriesNISER monograph series ;, no. 5, 2001., N.I.S.E.R. monograph series ;, 2001, no. 5.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD2346.N52 I224 2001
The Physical Object
Pagination51 p. ;
Number of Pages51
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3596325M
ISBN 109781812672
LC Control Number2002316561

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One of the key findings from the case studies was that cluster-based micro and small enterprises are performing better than similar micro and small enterprises outside of the clusters in terms of sales performance and ability to reach distant markets.

Market access is a leading reason for cluster-based enterprises to choose their current : World Bank. Why have informal enterprise networks failed to promote economic development in Africa. Although social networks were thought to offer a solution to state incapacity and market failure, the proliferation of socially embedded enterprise networks across Africa has generated disorder and economic decline rather than development.

This book challenges the prevailing assumption that the problem of. Small enterprise clusters are viewed as an important means of promoting competitive small‐firm development even in contexts of unstable markets and weak states. Yet the emergence of successful enterprise clusters in developing regions of Southern Europe, Asia and Latin America contrasts with their conspicuous absence in by: Abstract.

The concepts of cluster and networking emerged in s in Small and Medium Scale Enterprises (SMEs) literature but the formation ofSME clusters and networking is a very new strategy for Sri Lanka started in and Pakistan started in Author: SWSB Dasanayaka. A sample of enterprises out of enterprises was selected across different clusters comprising enterprises under production, trade, and services in the three cities.

Employing a regression technique, the study found that informal microfinance Author: Uzochukwu Amakom, Francis Ibeawuchi Amagwu. practices in two informal-sector micro and small enterprise (MSE) clusters in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa: a handloom-weaving cluster and a shoemaking cluster.

The activities in these two clusters were studied in order to explore the patterns of innovation in the MSEs, and to identify factors that influence collaboration and. Success Factors in Micro and Informal small enterprise clusters book Enterprises Cluster Development: A Case of Gullele Handloom Clusters in Ethiopia 1 CHAPTER ONE ORIENTATION Introduction The term cluster was first popularized and conceptualized by Michael Porter () of the Harvard Business School in his landmark work.

Conceptually, a cluster is a. It shows that formal social protection in Nigeria is small and not far reaching particularly to informal workers and enterprises.

This chapter shows that although the cluster ranks high in terms of the educational level of owners and management, it faces a hostile institutional milieu due to the weak support received from both national and.

Books. Home Policy Research Working Papers How do Small Formal and Informal Firms in the Arab Republic of Egypt Compare. An Analysis of Firm Characteristics and Implications for Formalization Efforts.

No Access Policy Research Working Papers 11 Nov Attributes of the Otigba Hardware Market. More than Informal small enterprise clusters book (%) of the enterprises considered it safe to share only small knowledge with their colleague within the cluster in order to remain competitive (Table 2).Only about % of the respondents saw no competitive threat in sharing knowledge with their colleagues, while only a few (%) saw sharing knowledge with colleagues as a.

This chapter examines some of the mechanisms used by informal financial institutions (IFIs) in Tanzania to build trust among transacting parties. Enterprise Clusters and Networks in Developing Countries book. credit layering and specialised, custom-tailored, small-scale services in which formal financial institutions have a cost.

A new and refreshing interest is focusing on Uganda's 'informal sector'. This is the economists' term for the thousands of small enterprises that do not keep books, that are not licenced to trade. " Mary Njeri Kinyanjui"Ziwani and Kigandaini Jua Kali Enterprises Cluster: Do Small Business Gain by Being in Close Proximity to Each Other", in Journal of African Research and Development, vol.

27&28, /98 pp ". Book Description: Why have informal enterprise networks failed to promote economic development in Africa. Although social networks were thought to offer a solution to state incapacity and market failure, the proliferation of socially embedded enterprise networks across Africa has generated disorder and economic decline rather than development.

Understanding SME Techno-Entrepreneurship in Nigeria's IT Clusters: /ch This chapter examines the concepts and issues of SME techno-entrepreneurship in ICT clusters. An integrative literature review was adopted and three. yearthe two clusters Meagher studied comprised nea small- scale enterprises, each with an average number of employees (including owners and apprentices) of no more than (or 4.

Among informal wage employees there is also a wide range of workers, including regular wage employees in the informal sector, casual and day labourers in the informal sector, and other wage employees, including informal sector enterprises, without employment-based.

DOI link for Asian Informal Workers. Asian Informal Workers book. Global Risks Local Protection. By Santosh K. Mehrotra, Mario Biggeri.

Edition 1st Edition. First Published Upgrading informal micro- and small enterprises through clusters: Towards a policy agenda. By SANTOSH MEHROTRA, MARIO BIGGERI. View abstract. informal-sector micro and small enterprises (MSEs) in Ethiopia. It makes use of the handloom- weaving and leather footwear sectors in Addis Ababa as lenses through which to explore the patterns of innovation in MSEs, and to identify factors that influence collaboration and the spread of knowledge among the enterprises.

Download Citation | Industrial Clusters, Institutions, and Poverty in Nigeria | This chapter gives an introduction to the book. It provides the background to the study, including the main themes. Three of the four small-enterprise clusters chiefly serve the local market.

Their main customers are local people buying products or services for their own use, and traders who take the products of manufacturing clusters to smaller towns and rural areas (McCormick, a ; McCormick, Kinyanjui and Ongile, ).

Small Enterprise Associations and Networks; 8. Trust Building in Tanzania\'s Informal Credit Transactions.\/span>\"@ en\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema:description\/a> \" Enterprise Clusters and Networks in Developing Countries analyses the functions and advantages of clusters and networks for small enterprises in developing countries.

Identity Economics traces the rise of two dynamic informal enterprise clusters in Nigeria, and explores their slide into trajectories of Pentecostalism, poverty and violent vigilantism. Drawing on over twenty years of empirical research on African informal economies, the author highlights the institutional legacies, networking strategies and Reviews: 1.

Manufacturing production in both developed and developing economies tends to be highly geographically concentrated in cities and industrial clusters.

Firms are drawn together for a variety of reasons, mostly motivated by the desire to reduce the costs of transporting goods, people, and ideas. In Vietnam, for example, large firms are surrounded by thousands of small enterprises in two major.

Try the new Google Books. Check out the new look and enjoy easier access to your favorite features. Try it now. No thanks. Try the new Google Books Get print book. No eBook available Informal sector - 52 pages.

0 Reviews. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents.

Small enterprise clusters are viewed as an important means of promoting competitive small-firm development even in contexts of unstable markets and weak states. Yet the emergence of successful enterprise clusters in developing regions of Southern Europe, Asia and Latin America contrasts with their conspicuous absence in Africa.

According to a study by Grabher [5], small and medium-size firm networks drew intense interest as competitive resources in specific industries.

In addition, based on Podolny and Page [6], every form of organization is a network. Krackhardt and Hanson [7] liken informal networks in organizations with the nervous system of a.

Unlike common depictions of the informal economy as a single “undifferentiated” group of workers, the sector is hugely dynamic, spanning a wide range of micro- small and medium enterprises, including workers employed at such businesses and self-employed workers who earn a living from activities such as domestic work, street trading or small-scale farming.

Get this from a library. The other India at work: job quality in micro and small enterprise clusters. [Gopal Joshi; Partha Sarkar; Sukumar Sah; Raman Swamy; International Labour Organisation. Subregional Office for South Asia.] -- Based on the findings of an International Labour Organisation study undertaken in in ten artisan clusters with special reference to North India.

Informal enterprises provide the transition space for people who have insufficient skills and assets to join the formal sector. networks and clusters of small enterprises must be. Small and medium-size enterprises in the Otigba Computer Village cluster 68 Tables Overview of 11 enterprise clusters in Africa 3 Sources of new ideas in the Mwenge handicrafts cluster 6 Education levels of entrepreneurs in selected clusters 8 Firms’ perception of government support in Nnewi cluster 11 Small enterprise clusters are viewed as an important means of promoting competitive small-firm development even in contexts of unstable markets and weak states.

Yet the emergence of successful enterprise clusters in developing regions of Southern Europe, Asia and Latin America contrasts with their conspicuous absence in Africa.

This article challenges ahistorical and culturalist explanations. In Vietnam, for example, large firms are surrounded by thousands of small enterprises in two major industrial clusters near Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City. In Africa, the "Suame Magazine" near Kumasi, Ghana is home to thousands of small metalworking firms.

Arusha, Tanzania is the site of several clusters of furniture manufacturers. Indeed, research has long shown that funds have been more readily available for businesses in the ‘formal economy,’ despite the bulk of small or informal business activities catering to a significant proportion of the population in developing countries (up to 60 percent in some African economies, see for example, Madichie et al., Zhikai Wang, in The Private Sector and China's Market Development, The socialised service platform for developing industrial clusters.

Private sector industrial clusters are mainly small enterprises, many of which are family is thus impossible for them to develop all the essential conditions for entrepreneurial development by relying on their own business strengths alone.

The Movement of Senior Staff and Their Competencies Between Enterprises in a High Technology Cluster: /ch The purpose of this chapter is to investigate the movement of senior staff and their competencies between enterprises in a high technology cluster (HTC).

Informal sector enterprises constitute about 50 per cent of informal sector employment. If these enterprises can grow then poverty can be impacted substantially. McCormick, D. () ‘African enterprise clusters and industrialization: theory and reality’, World Development 27(9): – M.A.

() ‘Growth of micro and small. The clusters of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have proven to be among the most dynamic ways to promote the growth of regional economic systems. As small and medium-sized firms were acknowledged as a source of jobs and income, they have gained an important position in the economic development agenda.

Dam safety is central to public protection and economic security. However, the world has an aging portfolio of large dams, with growing downstream populations and rapid urbanization placing dual pressures on these important infrastructures to provide increased services and to do it more safely.

According the World Bank (), the informal enterprises contribution in the ‘national output’ ranges from %. SMEDA website states that small and medium enterprises’ share is roughly. informal sector. of job seekHundreds ers come out of Zimbabwe’s school system each year with little chance of finding work in the formal sector.

The government is also doing its part by catering for this sector through the activities of the Ministry of Small and Medium Enterprises and organs such as Small Enterprises Development Corporation.

The reconstruction initiatives of post-apartheid South Africa, promoting and supporting the development of the small, medium and micro-enterprise (SMME) sector, including the informal economy, have been of major policy significance.(4) A watershed policy shift has occurred from the apartheid period when policymakers either largely neglected the.

Informal enterprises tend to be lean and specialized. A metalworker will start out specializing in one product--typically one he was trained to produce through an apprenticeship.

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